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Archive for May 2016

Certified coders in high demand following ICD-10 implementation

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(BPT) – Nine years ago, Peter Esswein, a resident of Sandy Springs, Georgia, enrolled in a health information technology degree program at DeVry University to capitalize on the growing prominence of electronic medical records.

“I always wanted to work in the medical industry, and the time was right for a personal career change,” Esswein says. “Completing my associate degree in health information technology gave me the confidence and skills I needed to progress on my new career path.”coders

Now, as Esswein continues his career as a coding quality assistant, health care is changing again. Following the release of a medical coding system overhaul in October 2015, expected updates in the near future are underscoring the demand for coders. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, or ICD-10, increased the number of medical codes by more than 50,000 – and in fiscal year 2017, about 5,500 more diagnostic and impatient procedure codes will roll out.

“The new codes are designed to enable more informative, accurate recording of the medical information required to bill correctly for reimbursement,” Esswein says. “In my role, it’s essential that I not only understand ICD-10, but that I’m staying ahead of what’s coming next to help alleviate any confusion in my workplace and mitigate mistakes in advance.”

Prepping for industry change

Many health care organizations say transitioning to the new system was their biggest challenge last year. While Esswein graduated years ago and is getting on-the-job training with the new system, many employers struggled to find qualified new technicians, since recent graduates had studied the previous classification system, ICD-9.

To get these new grads up to speed, DeVry University offered an ICD-10 course at no cost for medical billing and coding graduates who had registered by November 2015 and students in their last semester of the program. All future courses will be taught using ICD-10 as the standard.

“DeVry University programs will continue to evolve as healthcare advances and becomes more accessible in the United States,” says Kristyn Murphy-Rodvill, assistant national dean in the College of Health Sciences at DeVry University. “We know finishing a degree program during an industry transition can create obstacles for recent grads. Our ICD-10 course is designed to eliminate those barriers and prepare students with the skills and knowledge they need to be competitive in their field.”

Propelling the future of health care

Knowledgeable health information technology experts – from coders to technicians and managers – are projected to remain in high demand through 2022. Medical billing is projected to grow by 22 percent in this time period.

“With the right education, the future is bright for healthcare professionals,” says Murphy-Rodvill. “DeVry’s programs are designed to help students grow their professional expertise, and remain at the forefront in their industry.”

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Written by Tyrone Turner

May 24, 2016 at 5:45 pm

Working in a Hostile Environment

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Now, on this blog I generally don’t discuss religion, but I take truth and inspiration where I can find it.

T.D. Jakes did a sermon/lecture called “The Ten Commandments of Working in a Hostile Environment.”

Here are the 10 commandments:

  1. GOD anoints you in trouble
  2. Don’t expect to be appreciated
  3. Seek opportunities to change the atmosphere without commenting on the problems
  4. Do your job well, but remember your mission
  5. Don’t let your environment get inside of you
  6. Increase your capacity to work with different personalities
  7. Remember that where you are does not define where you are going
  8. The goal is optimum results with minimum confusion
  9. Do not pledge allegence with the many clicks and groups that are normal at the workplace
  10. Always keep your song near you

I found this video series to be full of gems that most people can use to better navigate the sometimes troubles waters of the workplace. Better than me giving you information second-hand, I invite you to look at the video series yourself.

Below is the first video in the seven video series:

Let me know what you think.

Kill the 9-to-5 by turning your hobby into a thriving business

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(BPT) – A beloved hobby can feel like a mini vacation from everyday life. Whether it’s gardening for relaxation, photography as a creative outlet or computer coding to exercise the brain, hobbies serve as an escape from stress and boredom.

What if rather than a hobby being your escape, it was what you did for a career?

“When you do what you love, it doesn’t feel like work. However, people are intimidated by the idea of transitioning a hobby into this type of dream,” says Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal Credit Union. “Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t have to be difficult with the right drive and passion.”

hobby to biz

Navy Federal Business Services has helped thousands of people turn their dreams of owning a small business into reality by providing expert guidance and financial support through Business Services products. Here are some of Salmon’s expert tips based on best practices he’s observed through his close relationship with entrepreneurial clients:

1. Take your time.
Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to drop everything and devote all your time to starting a business. In fact, research shows the opposite: People who keep their day jobs while starting companies are a third less likely to fail than those who abandon their full time jobs. Instead, they’re tinkering, researching and cautiously testing things out to see if their idea is a viable business venture and if there is a market for their product or service.

2. Set a timeline.
Is there a season where it would make sense to test out your business venture? Or perhaps there’s a transitional time in your life where you’ll be looking to open a new chapter. For example, transitioning your hobby into a viable business venture a great option for active duty military personnel and veterans because they naturally begin to think about what their second career will be after retiring or leaving the Armed Forces.

3. Decide on time commitment.
Decide how much time you are willing to dedicate to your new venture in the beginning. Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss which affords you unprecedented flexibility, but the effort you put in directly effects what you get out. Keep in mind, entrepreneurship isn’t just for full-time professionals. Turning a hobby into a career is a great option for military and stay-at-home parents who require flexibility in regards to working hours and location, but they may have more open time to dedicate to the transition.

4. Create a business plan.
Transitioning a hobby into a profession is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business if you want to be successful. That means creating a business plan that includes goals and plans for attaining them. This will serve as the foundation for how you strategize and build a successful business today. Plus, when it comes time to finance your budding business, a solid business plan will give you a leg up and direction for the future.

5. Find financial backing.
Depending on what type of business you want to pursue, you may need some additional funding beyond what you can afford. Establishing a relationship with a financial institution like Navy Federal Credit Union will help you learn more about small business loans and lending products that will help your small business grow. Bring your passion and your business plan – potential investors and financial institutions alike will want to see both before they make a decision.