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Do you need to work a full-time job?

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Truth is only you can answer that question.

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However, I’d like to share information with you about the potential benefits one can enjoy while working part-time instead of full-time.

Since I left my last job working with a NYC agency, I have been working part-time and I must say that I like it. Of course, my income is not what it used to be, but this is a temporary situation. While I have been working part-time I have enrolled in an information technology school where I am training to become an IT Engineer. As an IT Engineer I will be able to assist and answer just about any question as it pertains to computer repair, installation and upgrade all Windows, MAC, and Linux systems. There is no way that I would have been able to take this course if I was working full-time.

Some say that they have full-time bills so a part-time income will not cut it. I understand that, but I have two part-time jobs so money is coming in and I have other “hustles.” Additionally, consider this: Abraham Lincoln said, “It I had four hours to chop down a tree three of those hours would be spent sharpening my ax.” That is why I’m in school – sharpening my ax so that I can chop down bigger money trees in the future.

Upon completion of my training, I will look to take a part-time internship so that I can gain experience and then eventually ease into a career as a contracted IT consultant.

Oh…

Let me tell you about my two current part-time jobs.

I work part-time for two non-profit organizations. One is where I work as a program facilitator with urban youth teaching them various socially desirable behaviors and skills and teaching academic courses in an innovative way using elements of Hip Hop music. The other part-time job is working with the YMCA as a martial arts instructor teaching children and teens Karate and teaching adults practical personal protection.

I’m also started a home-based direct sales business, but I admittedly haven’t done too much with it as of yet. It is documented that the products and the compensation plan work, but you as an independent sales agent must work to generate revenue – of course. I say that with a touch of sarcasm because it amazes me how people complain that they don’t make money in these kind of businesses, but they don’t get off of their butts to do the required work. Perhaps they don’t understand that the only thing that falls from the sky are rain drops and snow flakes – not money.

Anyway, I’d like to share a few resources to help you figure out if working part-time is feasible for you over working full-time.

Here are links to three articles that I think you may find interesting:

Thank you for your time and attention, and may whichever path you choose for yourself, I hope that it yields a bountiful harvest.

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Healthy career outlook for health care professionals with law skills

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(BPT) – Career opportunities in the health care industry are expected to continue growing more quickly than in virtually any other industry, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook. Not only is the health care industry expected to add more than 2 million new jobs by 2024, many existing roles will continue to evolve, creating additional opportunities for professionals currently working in what is a very broad field.

Health care law is one area seeing significant growth, thanks in part to the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s one of the fastest-growing disciplines for graduate and post-graduate degrees, according to Lawyer & Statesman. The changes spurred by the ACA are also inspiring many professionals to learn more about the law to enhance their career opportunities and boost their skill sets.

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“Health care professionals routinely find their day-to-day tasks affected by legal issues like regulatory compliance, risk management, malpractice, ethics, and patient privacy,” says Scott Johnson, professor of law at Concord Law School, part of Kaplan University. “Recent laws and regulations governing these issues and the delivery of health services generally make knowledge of health care law a real career asset these days. A background in law can help a wide range of professionals, from administrators to clinicians to technology entrepreneurs be more effective in their current roles and better positioned to seize emerging opportunities.”

Legal expertise can benefit health care professionals and their patients across many aspects of the industry, but it is particularly helpful in three key areas, Johnson notes:

* Regulatory compliance – Compliance professionals help providers prevent, detect, and correct any actions, policies, or procedures that are counter to the many regulations governing the health care industry. They also help promote ethical conduct. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 propelled growth in this area and regulatory compliance has been one of the fastest-growing professions over the past 15 years. Health care professionals in a wide range of positions including those who work with electronic health records, Medicare or Medicaid requirements, or the various requirements from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could benefit from knowledge of legal issues related to regulatory compliance.

* Ethics – A subspecialty of regulatory compliance, knowing legal issues related to ethics is particularly important for professionals working in facilities where research also takes place. Bioethical principles and standards cover areas such as human subject research, genetic privacy, patient rights, rehabilitation ethics and more.

* Risk management – This discipline focuses on reducing errors to protect patients as well as health care employers. This includes provider and institutional liability, notification and apology programs, risk assessments, patient safety, and adverse event reporting.

The growth of health care law has encouraged schools to create specialized degree programs for professionals seeking added legal expertise, but not planning to become practicing attorneys. For example, Kaplan’s Concord Law School offers a health care law track within its Executive Juris Doctorate (EJD) program. Since most industry professionals are working full-time, and often outside of the typical 9-5 work day, going back to school can be challenging. However, as the first fully online law school since 1998, Concord provides a unique solution.

“One of the great benefits of the online EJD Health Law program is that it is offered through our law school,” Johnson says. “EJD students take the same classes that our law students take and they learn from the same law professors. Attending our law school provides EJD students with a thorough understanding of the law. They enjoy the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to analyze the law and explain its impact. Plus, they get to do all of it in a flexible, online program. EJD students can apply these skills by helping health care providers and professionals comply with the myriad of state and federal laws that govern health care.”

To learn more about Concord Law School and the health care law track, visit www.concordlawschool.edu.

Certified coders in high demand following ICD-10 implementation

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(BPT) – Nine years ago, Peter Esswein, a resident of Sandy Springs, Georgia, enrolled in a health information technology degree program at DeVry University to capitalize on the growing prominence of electronic medical records.

“I always wanted to work in the medical industry, and the time was right for a personal career change,” Esswein says. “Completing my associate degree in health information technology gave me the confidence and skills I needed to progress on my new career path.”coders

Now, as Esswein continues his career as a coding quality assistant, health care is changing again. Following the release of a medical coding system overhaul in October 2015, expected updates in the near future are underscoring the demand for coders. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, or ICD-10, increased the number of medical codes by more than 50,000 – and in fiscal year 2017, about 5,500 more diagnostic and impatient procedure codes will roll out.

“The new codes are designed to enable more informative, accurate recording of the medical information required to bill correctly for reimbursement,” Esswein says. “In my role, it’s essential that I not only understand ICD-10, but that I’m staying ahead of what’s coming next to help alleviate any confusion in my workplace and mitigate mistakes in advance.”

Prepping for industry change

Many health care organizations say transitioning to the new system was their biggest challenge last year. While Esswein graduated years ago and is getting on-the-job training with the new system, many employers struggled to find qualified new technicians, since recent graduates had studied the previous classification system, ICD-9.

To get these new grads up to speed, DeVry University offered an ICD-10 course at no cost for medical billing and coding graduates who had registered by November 2015 and students in their last semester of the program. All future courses will be taught using ICD-10 as the standard.

“DeVry University programs will continue to evolve as healthcare advances and becomes more accessible in the United States,” says Kristyn Murphy-Rodvill, assistant national dean in the College of Health Sciences at DeVry University. “We know finishing a degree program during an industry transition can create obstacles for recent grads. Our ICD-10 course is designed to eliminate those barriers and prepare students with the skills and knowledge they need to be competitive in their field.”

Propelling the future of health care

Knowledgeable health information technology experts – from coders to technicians and managers – are projected to remain in high demand through 2022. Medical billing is projected to grow by 22 percent in this time period.

“With the right education, the future is bright for healthcare professionals,” says Murphy-Rodvill. “DeVry’s programs are designed to help students grow their professional expertise, and remain at the forefront in their industry.”

Written by Tyrone Turner

May 24, 2016 at 5:45 pm

Kill the 9-to-5 by turning your hobby into a thriving business

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(BPT) – A beloved hobby can feel like a mini vacation from everyday life. Whether it’s gardening for relaxation, photography as a creative outlet or computer coding to exercise the brain, hobbies serve as an escape from stress and boredom.

What if rather than a hobby being your escape, it was what you did for a career?

“When you do what you love, it doesn’t feel like work. However, people are intimidated by the idea of transitioning a hobby into this type of dream,” says Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal Credit Union. “Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t have to be difficult with the right drive and passion.”

hobby to biz

Navy Federal Business Services has helped thousands of people turn their dreams of owning a small business into reality by providing expert guidance and financial support through Business Services products. Here are some of Salmon’s expert tips based on best practices he’s observed through his close relationship with entrepreneurial clients:

1. Take your time.
Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to drop everything and devote all your time to starting a business. In fact, research shows the opposite: People who keep their day jobs while starting companies are a third less likely to fail than those who abandon their full time jobs. Instead, they’re tinkering, researching and cautiously testing things out to see if their idea is a viable business venture and if there is a market for their product or service.

2. Set a timeline.
Is there a season where it would make sense to test out your business venture? Or perhaps there’s a transitional time in your life where you’ll be looking to open a new chapter. For example, transitioning your hobby into a viable business venture a great option for active duty military personnel and veterans because they naturally begin to think about what their second career will be after retiring or leaving the Armed Forces.

3. Decide on time commitment.
Decide how much time you are willing to dedicate to your new venture in the beginning. Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss which affords you unprecedented flexibility, but the effort you put in directly effects what you get out. Keep in mind, entrepreneurship isn’t just for full-time professionals. Turning a hobby into a career is a great option for military and stay-at-home parents who require flexibility in regards to working hours and location, but they may have more open time to dedicate to the transition.

4. Create a business plan.
Transitioning a hobby into a profession is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business if you want to be successful. That means creating a business plan that includes goals and plans for attaining them. This will serve as the foundation for how you strategize and build a successful business today. Plus, when it comes time to finance your budding business, a solid business plan will give you a leg up and direction for the future.

5. Find financial backing.
Depending on what type of business you want to pursue, you may need some additional funding beyond what you can afford. Establishing a relationship with a financial institution like Navy Federal Credit Union will help you learn more about small business loans and lending products that will help your small business grow. Bring your passion and your business plan – potential investors and financial institutions alike will want to see both before they make a decision.

Start up your future: Teaching for today’s entrepreneurial business culture

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(BPT) – Every year Christine Rainwater asks her Washington, D.C.-based undergraduate business students the same question on their first day of class: are any of you interested in starting a business?

“Ten years ago, I would only get two or three students to raise their hands,” said Rainwater, a DeVry University professor and president of the Small Business Advisory Firm. “Now, the majority of my students do – and some share ideas even before class begins. It really represents a new mindset as students take a more entrepreneurial approach to learning. I think they’re surrounded by fast-growing startups like Uber and GrubHub, and they feel inspired to quickly bring their own business ideas to life.”

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Business enterprise shows like Shark Tank, Beyond the Tank, and How I Made My Millions are indicative of a bigger business trend: renewed growth in small business and startup ventures. According to the 2015 Kauffman Index of Startup Activity and National Trends, the Startup Activity Index rose in 2015 – reversing a downward trend that began in 2010 – allowing the largest year-over-year increase in the past twenty years.

“Students see new, successful companies run by young creatives whose passion propelled them to success faster than climbing the traditional corporate ladder,” said Rainwater. “Not only is this inspiring more people to do the same, but it’s encouraging a whole new type of student to head back to school looking for resume-building experience that can jump-start job prospects right out of the program.”

Shaping a New Culture of Entrepreneurs
Today’s college student is different than past generations. In fact, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, nearly 75 percent of undergraduate students today could be considered “non-traditional.” They are often busy, working adults that have to balance the demands of school, work and family life.

Several non-traditional students need colleges that can fit into their busy schedules of work and family responsibilities. Moreover, many are coming back to school because they want to advance their current career or move to a new field quickly. Non-traditional students want their degree to speak for itself, demonstrating their capabilities and value.

That’s why Rainwater puts hands-on learning at the center of her curriculum.

“In my Senior Projects course, I challenge my students to explore their own neighborhoods, develop business plans for local companies and even kick-start businesses of their own,” she said. “It’s always rewarding to see their eyes light up when they first come up with a viable idea, or see the impact they’ve made in their communities.”

The approach has given students real-life experience and has encouraged collaboration with local organizations. Online grocery store Relay Foods enlisted the help of Rainwater’s students to revamp their salsa canning and distribution plan. As a result, the students were able to help the grocer increase brand awareness and customer appeal for their signature salsa. Another student turned her passion for making premium homemade soap into a business, eventually turning the side job into an online boutique.

The Benefits of Breakthrough for Rising Innovators
Outside the classroom, Rainwater is the president of the Small Business Advisory Firm, a network focused on meeting the educational, networking and program-specific requirements to compete in the federal and private-sector contracting environment.

“In the past, people had to go through an extensive process to start their own businesses,” said Rainwater. “Today, technology has removed many of the barriers that used to stand between big thinkers and entrepreneurship.”

Rainwater considers immersive learning an imperative tool for business students’ professional development. She believes that it not only fosters creative thinking and entrepreneurial spirit, but also creates a safe environment for students to build tangible skills that can be immediately implemented in the workplace – across a variety of roles and practices.

To help today’s students learn more about starting a new business, DeVry University offers a small business management and entrepreneurship degree specialization within its College of Business & Management. At the graduate level, its Keller Graduate School of Management offers an entrepreneurship concentration within its MBA program.

“Right now, U.S. startup activity is rising for the first time in five years, showing entrepreneurs are the most hopeful they have been in several years,” said Rainwater. “And the beauty of these entrepreneurship programs is they not only teach students how to grow businesses, but they arm them with skills to succeed when they hit obstacles along the way – setting them up for long-term success.”

Written by Tyrone Turner

April 20, 2016 at 9:45 pm

Never Vulnerable Again!

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Hey there, folks. It has been a long while since I posted. I have been caught up with working, being a family man, training in martial arts, and trying to get more fun and rest in. In the past two years or so is the first time in several years that I didn’t have some sort of a side business to supplement my 9 to 5 income.

My 9 to 5 situation has become a little shaky recently after I suffered an injury that has really side-lined me. I needed surgery and all. Now, money is a little tight in my household. We’re getting by, but our quality of life has diminished.

multiple streams

Why am I even telling you all of this?

Not for sympathy and not because I’m going to set-up a GoFundMe page to ask for donations or anything like that, but rather to give you a warning by example to not put all of your eggs in one basket.

That is to say don’t rely solely on your income from your job. Things can change quickly and an employee can be fired for no reason or any reason at all (except if discrimination can be proven) in 49 out of 50 states — Montana being the exception.

I strongly encourage you find something that you can do on the side to create some “cushion cash” in case something changes at your job. Learn from my mistake of becoming too comfortable. As a martial artist and past recreational boxer, I should know that I did in fact violate rule number one: Protect yourself at all times.

I am going to get back into teaching martial arts classes again after I fully recover from my injury. But what I’m really looking to do, is to create passive, recurring income. A friend of mine from Texas, named Esther, told me about a cool side business that I can operate from home. I also have realized that there are numerous tax benefits in that I can write-off a lot of the money I was already spending as classify those expenditures as business expenses. That way, I will get a larger tax return next year. It is sort of like double-dipping in that I am increasing my income and keeping more money in my pocket because I have a smaller tax bill. That is cool.

I’m building a strong fortress that the Big Bad Wolf of injury and lost pay cannot blow down.

I plan to never be vulnerable again!

Please, take care of yourself and learn from my mistake.

Thank about your current hobbies and see if you can monetize it. It will create another source of income and help you stay afloat if something happens to your job.

Thanks for your time.

My 2014 Year In Review

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Happy New Year, everybody! I truly hope that 2015 brings you increased peace and good fortune. Thinking back on 2014, I’d say that it was a pretty good year for me. Black folks in who have roots in the Southeastern US are familiar with an old saying: “We ain’t what we wanna be and we and what we gonna be, but thank GOD we ain’t who we was!”

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2014 was a year of new beginnings for me. I was able to get a new job after being unemployed for more than a year [Sidebar: I’m a Citizen Lobbyist for the passage of the Healthy Workplace Bill here in New York State for a reason]. 2013 really kicked me in at gut in so many different ways, but the sun did indeed come out again in 2014. I will not ramble on here in the blog post by providing exhaustive details of things that happened, but I will share this quick list of 10 things that I learned:

  1. Friends are few
  2. Allies can morph into enemies
  3. Most people are not evil, but may be arrogant, apathetic, and afraid
  4. Recreating yourself to adapt to change is crucial for survival
  5. If you don’t stand for something, you will fall for anything.
  6. When in a fight, you WILL get hit
  7. Published work (e.g., reports, white papers, articles and books) are the new business card
  8. People are watching when you think they are not
  9. It is better to conduct research and ask clarifying questions rather than argue
  10. If you don’t have more than one income source, you are at risk

Again, all the best to you in 2015.