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Healthy career outlook for health care professionals with law skills

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(BPT) – Career opportunities in the health care industry are expected to continue growing more quickly than in virtually any other industry, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook. Not only is the health care industry expected to add more than 2 million new jobs by 2024, many existing roles will continue to evolve, creating additional opportunities for professionals currently working in what is a very broad field.

Health care law is one area seeing significant growth, thanks in part to the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s one of the fastest-growing disciplines for graduate and post-graduate degrees, according to Lawyer & Statesman. The changes spurred by the ACA are also inspiring many professionals to learn more about the law to enhance their career opportunities and boost their skill sets.

health careers

“Health care professionals routinely find their day-to-day tasks affected by legal issues like regulatory compliance, risk management, malpractice, ethics, and patient privacy,” says Scott Johnson, professor of law at Concord Law School, part of Kaplan University. “Recent laws and regulations governing these issues and the delivery of health services generally make knowledge of health care law a real career asset these days. A background in law can help a wide range of professionals, from administrators to clinicians to technology entrepreneurs be more effective in their current roles and better positioned to seize emerging opportunities.”

Legal expertise can benefit health care professionals and their patients across many aspects of the industry, but it is particularly helpful in three key areas, Johnson notes:

* Regulatory compliance – Compliance professionals help providers prevent, detect, and correct any actions, policies, or procedures that are counter to the many regulations governing the health care industry. They also help promote ethical conduct. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 propelled growth in this area and regulatory compliance has been one of the fastest-growing professions over the past 15 years. Health care professionals in a wide range of positions including those who work with electronic health records, Medicare or Medicaid requirements, or the various requirements from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could benefit from knowledge of legal issues related to regulatory compliance.

* Ethics – A subspecialty of regulatory compliance, knowing legal issues related to ethics is particularly important for professionals working in facilities where research also takes place. Bioethical principles and standards cover areas such as human subject research, genetic privacy, patient rights, rehabilitation ethics and more.

* Risk management – This discipline focuses on reducing errors to protect patients as well as health care employers. This includes provider and institutional liability, notification and apology programs, risk assessments, patient safety, and adverse event reporting.

The growth of health care law has encouraged schools to create specialized degree programs for professionals seeking added legal expertise, but not planning to become practicing attorneys. For example, Kaplan’s Concord Law School offers a health care law track within its Executive Juris Doctorate (EJD) program. Since most industry professionals are working full-time, and often outside of the typical 9-5 work day, going back to school can be challenging. However, as the first fully online law school since 1998, Concord provides a unique solution.

“One of the great benefits of the online EJD Health Law program is that it is offered through our law school,” Johnson says. “EJD students take the same classes that our law students take and they learn from the same law professors. Attending our law school provides EJD students with a thorough understanding of the law. They enjoy the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to analyze the law and explain its impact. Plus, they get to do all of it in a flexible, online program. EJD students can apply these skills by helping health care providers and professionals comply with the myriad of state and federal laws that govern health care.”

To learn more about Concord Law School and the health care law track, visit www.concordlawschool.edu.

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Kill the 9-to-5 by turning your hobby into a thriving business

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(BPT) – A beloved hobby can feel like a mini vacation from everyday life. Whether it’s gardening for relaxation, photography as a creative outlet or computer coding to exercise the brain, hobbies serve as an escape from stress and boredom.

What if rather than a hobby being your escape, it was what you did for a career?

“When you do what you love, it doesn’t feel like work. However, people are intimidated by the idea of transitioning a hobby into this type of dream,” says Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal Credit Union. “Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t have to be difficult with the right drive and passion.”

hobby to biz

Navy Federal Business Services has helped thousands of people turn their dreams of owning a small business into reality by providing expert guidance and financial support through Business Services products. Here are some of Salmon’s expert tips based on best practices he’s observed through his close relationship with entrepreneurial clients:

1. Take your time.
Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to drop everything and devote all your time to starting a business. In fact, research shows the opposite: People who keep their day jobs while starting companies are a third less likely to fail than those who abandon their full time jobs. Instead, they’re tinkering, researching and cautiously testing things out to see if their idea is a viable business venture and if there is a market for their product or service.

2. Set a timeline.
Is there a season where it would make sense to test out your business venture? Or perhaps there’s a transitional time in your life where you’ll be looking to open a new chapter. For example, transitioning your hobby into a viable business venture a great option for active duty military personnel and veterans because they naturally begin to think about what their second career will be after retiring or leaving the Armed Forces.

3. Decide on time commitment.
Decide how much time you are willing to dedicate to your new venture in the beginning. Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss which affords you unprecedented flexibility, but the effort you put in directly effects what you get out. Keep in mind, entrepreneurship isn’t just for full-time professionals. Turning a hobby into a career is a great option for military and stay-at-home parents who require flexibility in regards to working hours and location, but they may have more open time to dedicate to the transition.

4. Create a business plan.
Transitioning a hobby into a profession is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business if you want to be successful. That means creating a business plan that includes goals and plans for attaining them. This will serve as the foundation for how you strategize and build a successful business today. Plus, when it comes time to finance your budding business, a solid business plan will give you a leg up and direction for the future.

5. Find financial backing.
Depending on what type of business you want to pursue, you may need some additional funding beyond what you can afford. Establishing a relationship with a financial institution like Navy Federal Credit Union will help you learn more about small business loans and lending products that will help your small business grow. Bring your passion and your business plan – potential investors and financial institutions alike will want to see both before they make a decision.

Back to Life and Hard Lessons Learned

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In the early 90’s when I was a college student, Arsenio Hall was part of my daily routine. I went to classes at St. John’s University in Jamaica (Queens, NY), went to work part-time at a prominent law firm based in Midtown Manhattan, then came home and made sure to watch The Arsenio Hall Show each night before going to sleep. His show ended rather abruptly without a clear reason as to why. Arsenio is back and after I saw the below interview with CNN’s Don Lemon, I became an even bigger fan than I was before.

"Celebrity Apprentice" Live Finale

Listen to the pearls of wisdom Arsenio shares in this interview and be inspired.

I like what he said about adversity: “You learn a lot about the people around you.”

Truer words have not been spoken.

Let me know your thoughts on this video. Thanks.

CLICK HERE FOR THE VIDEO

The 52 Corporate Caveats

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demotivational-poster-jhuwi4nstz-GETTING-THROWN-UNDER-THE-BUSEver been thrown under the bus at work? It is not a good feeling at all. It is usually a horrible boss, a jealous peer or some other workplace bully that is trying to cover their tracks. I’ve worked in Corporate America for more than 25 years now and I have seen a lot. The good, the bad, the ugly and the stupid.

I was inspired by one of my favorite authors, Robert Greene when I wrote this eBook. He wrote The 48 Laws of Power and The 33 Strategies of War. I was tweeting tips for corporate survival under the hash tag #loveyourenemies and after I counted them all I realized that there were 52. That was cool because as a martial artist, there is an urban combat system called “52 Blocks” and there are 52 cards in a deck of cards. If you’re looking to make an impact in Corporate America as an intrapreneur, you really need to know how to block (i.e., defend yourself) and have these cards up your sleeve.

This eBook is a free download. The information shared here is so important I didn’t want price to be a barrier from you getting a copy. Please read this eBook. If is full of proven strategies and introduces various resources that you can use to protect yourself any any corporate shenanigans that may come your way. Please let me know your thoughts. Thank you.

The 52 Corporate Caveats from Tyrone Turner

It’s all about F.A.M.I.L.Y.

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happy_employees222

This is an excerpt from my upcoming book, The 52 Corporate Caveats.

It will be a digital download and will be released this coming fall.

____________________________

Okay, I talked about how things can suck so it is only fair that I offer a solution. You know, it always killed me on some folks criticize things but never offer alternatives. I remember when I was at a seminar a few years back and the author of The Slight Edge, Jeff Olson, said, “Have you noticed that there are no statues erected in the honor of critics?” That is so true! I committed at that moment to not criticize anything unless I was willing to work on finding a better way.

So, what with this proposed workplace code I’m not talking about bringing the kids and your spouse to work. I’m talking about a new doctrine that could be used in the workplace that could yield better results; more revenue, more happiness and more hope for advancement. F.A.M.I.L.Y. is an acronym. I would be remiss if I did not admit that this was inspired by my experience working in the direct selling industry where cooperation is encouraged over competition. A good leader should work to encourage these things in her little fiefdom in order to create the “perfect workplace.” Now, people are not perfect, but if we adopt this as our code we will get better.

Here is what F.A.M.I.L.Y. is all about:

Fairness

Everyone is to be treated with appreciation and respect, and any progress or special dates (e.g. birthdays, anniversaries with the company, promotions, etc.) should be celebrated. Your skin color, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, religion, political views, handicaps, health nor any other legally protected class should be a factor. Whether you average-looking, ugly, drop-dead gorgeous matters not. It is all about giving everyone equal access to opportunities and to due process.

Accountability

Everyone is to be held accountable for their actions and/or the lack thereof. No more “throwing others under the bus” to save one’s own hide. How can you have true success at work when everyone is suspicious of each other? Let’s all be adults and like President Harry Truman used to say, “The buck stops here.” That is the mindset that needs to be instilled in today’s workers.

Merit-based Promotions

Ideally, promotions will be based on merit. Let’ start picking the right man for the job. By the way, oftentimes, the right man for the job is a woman. Organizations can’t achieve greatness with “hooking-up” their cronies. Put the right people in right positions and beautiful things can happen.

Intrapreneurship

The best ideas come from the field. I heard that Post-It® Notes was created by a 3M employee. Companies should start paying attention that their employees have a wealth of ideas. As a matter of fact, companies oftentimes steal employee-generated ideas and claim them as their own intellectual property as per the employee handbook. Dang. At least give the employees some sort of incentives and recognition. Well, they don’t know about the F.A.M.I.L.Y. code yet so maybe they’ll do better once we school them. Nurture employees and encourage them to come up with new ways to do things or to submit product ideas. Have them take entrepreneurial-like initiatives while working for the company.
Intrapreneurship is the new cool.

Leadership

I believe that leaders are made, not born. Skills can be taught. If you want your employees to be better, Corporate America has to do better with giving them educational opportunities. This can be classroom instruction, tuition reimbursement, mentorship or cross-training. Also, leaders need to understand that you must be a servant to your employees first. Being the boss doesn’t mean that you have to be a “double S.O.B.” spelled backwards!

Yeoman Work Ethic

Projects should be handled with enthusiasm and a sense of urgency from beginning to end. Revenue is lost because of lethargic work habits. Work hard so you can play hard. Like the great rapper, Big Daddy Kane said in his song, RAW, “I worked like a slave so I can become a master.” Ideally, this is how one gets promoted.

All six parts of F.A.M.I.L.Y. are interdependent on each other. You have to have all of them firing on all cylinders to create the perfect workplace. Will there ever be the perfect workplace? No. Nonetheless, it is an ideal to strive for because most current options stink.