The Whole 9 Yards

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Posts Tagged ‘tyrone turner

Do you need to work a full-time job?

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Truth is only you can answer that question.

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However, I’d like to share information with you about the potential benefits one can enjoy while working part-time instead of full-time.

Since I left my last job working with a NYC agency, I have been working part-time and I must say that I like it. Of course, my income is not what it used to be, but this is a temporary situation. While I have been working part-time I have enrolled in an information technology school where I am training to become an IT Engineer. As an IT Engineer I will be able to assist and answer just about any question as it pertains to computer repair, installation and upgrade all Windows, MAC, and Linux systems. There is no way that I would have been able to take this course if I was working full-time.

Some say that they have full-time bills so a part-time income will not cut it. I understand that, but I have two part-time jobs so money is coming in and I have other “hustles.” Additionally, consider this: Abraham Lincoln said, “It I had four hours to chop down a tree three of those hours would be spent sharpening my ax.” That is why I’m in school – sharpening my ax so that I can chop down bigger money trees in the future.

Upon completion of my training, I will look to take a part-time internship so that I can gain experience and then eventually ease into a career as a contracted IT consultant.

Oh…

Let me tell you about my two current part-time jobs.

I work part-time for two non-profit organizations. One is where I work as a program facilitator with urban youth teaching them various socially desirable behaviors and skills and teaching academic courses in an innovative way using elements of Hip Hop music. The other part-time job is working with the YMCA as a martial arts instructor teaching children and teens Karate and teaching adults practical personal protection.

I’m also started a home-based direct sales business, but I admittedly haven’t done too much with it as of yet. It is documented that the products and the compensation plan work, but you as an independent sales agent must work to generate revenue – of course. I say that with a touch of sarcasm because it amazes me how people complain that they don’t make money in these kind of businesses, but they don’t get off of their butts to do the required work. Perhaps they don’t understand that the only thing that falls from the sky are rain drops and snow flakes – not money.

Anyway, I’d like to share a few resources to help you figure out if working part-time is feasible for you over working full-time.

Here are links to three articles that I think you may find interesting:

Thank you for your time and attention, and may whichever path you choose for yourself, I hope that it yields a bountiful harvest.

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Healthy career outlook for health care professionals with law skills

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(BPT) – Career opportunities in the health care industry are expected to continue growing more quickly than in virtually any other industry, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook. Not only is the health care industry expected to add more than 2 million new jobs by 2024, many existing roles will continue to evolve, creating additional opportunities for professionals currently working in what is a very broad field.

Health care law is one area seeing significant growth, thanks in part to the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s one of the fastest-growing disciplines for graduate and post-graduate degrees, according to Lawyer & Statesman. The changes spurred by the ACA are also inspiring many professionals to learn more about the law to enhance their career opportunities and boost their skill sets.

health careers

“Health care professionals routinely find their day-to-day tasks affected by legal issues like regulatory compliance, risk management, malpractice, ethics, and patient privacy,” says Scott Johnson, professor of law at Concord Law School, part of Kaplan University. “Recent laws and regulations governing these issues and the delivery of health services generally make knowledge of health care law a real career asset these days. A background in law can help a wide range of professionals, from administrators to clinicians to technology entrepreneurs be more effective in their current roles and better positioned to seize emerging opportunities.”

Legal expertise can benefit health care professionals and their patients across many aspects of the industry, but it is particularly helpful in three key areas, Johnson notes:

* Regulatory compliance – Compliance professionals help providers prevent, detect, and correct any actions, policies, or procedures that are counter to the many regulations governing the health care industry. They also help promote ethical conduct. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 propelled growth in this area and regulatory compliance has been one of the fastest-growing professions over the past 15 years. Health care professionals in a wide range of positions including those who work with electronic health records, Medicare or Medicaid requirements, or the various requirements from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could benefit from knowledge of legal issues related to regulatory compliance.

* Ethics – A subspecialty of regulatory compliance, knowing legal issues related to ethics is particularly important for professionals working in facilities where research also takes place. Bioethical principles and standards cover areas such as human subject research, genetic privacy, patient rights, rehabilitation ethics and more.

* Risk management – This discipline focuses on reducing errors to protect patients as well as health care employers. This includes provider and institutional liability, notification and apology programs, risk assessments, patient safety, and adverse event reporting.

The growth of health care law has encouraged schools to create specialized degree programs for professionals seeking added legal expertise, but not planning to become practicing attorneys. For example, Kaplan’s Concord Law School offers a health care law track within its Executive Juris Doctorate (EJD) program. Since most industry professionals are working full-time, and often outside of the typical 9-5 work day, going back to school can be challenging. However, as the first fully online law school since 1998, Concord provides a unique solution.

“One of the great benefits of the online EJD Health Law program is that it is offered through our law school,” Johnson says. “EJD students take the same classes that our law students take and they learn from the same law professors. Attending our law school provides EJD students with a thorough understanding of the law. They enjoy the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to analyze the law and explain its impact. Plus, they get to do all of it in a flexible, online program. EJD students can apply these skills by helping health care providers and professionals comply with the myriad of state and federal laws that govern health care.”

To learn more about Concord Law School and the health care law track, visit www.concordlawschool.edu.

Working in a Hostile Environment

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Now, on this blog I generally don’t discuss religion, but I take truth and inspiration where I can find it.

T.D. Jakes did a sermon/lecture called “The Ten Commandments of Working in a Hostile Environment.”

Here are the 10 commandments:

  1. GOD anoints you in trouble
  2. Don’t expect to be appreciated
  3. Seek opportunities to change the atmosphere without commenting on the problems
  4. Do your job well, but remember your mission
  5. Don’t let your environment get inside of you
  6. Increase your capacity to work with different personalities
  7. Remember that where you are does not define where you are going
  8. The goal is optimum results with minimum confusion
  9. Do not pledge allegence with the many clicks and groups that are normal at the workplace
  10. Always keep your song near you

I found this video series to be full of gems that most people can use to better navigate the sometimes troubles waters of the workplace. Better than me giving you information second-hand, I invite you to look at the video series yourself.

Below is the first video in the seven video series:

Let me know what you think.

Kill the 9-to-5 by turning your hobby into a thriving business

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(BPT) – A beloved hobby can feel like a mini vacation from everyday life. Whether it’s gardening for relaxation, photography as a creative outlet or computer coding to exercise the brain, hobbies serve as an escape from stress and boredom.

What if rather than a hobby being your escape, it was what you did for a career?

“When you do what you love, it doesn’t feel like work. However, people are intimidated by the idea of transitioning a hobby into this type of dream,” says Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal Credit Union. “Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t have to be difficult with the right drive and passion.”

hobby to biz

Navy Federal Business Services has helped thousands of people turn their dreams of owning a small business into reality by providing expert guidance and financial support through Business Services products. Here are some of Salmon’s expert tips based on best practices he’s observed through his close relationship with entrepreneurial clients:

1. Take your time.
Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to drop everything and devote all your time to starting a business. In fact, research shows the opposite: People who keep their day jobs while starting companies are a third less likely to fail than those who abandon their full time jobs. Instead, they’re tinkering, researching and cautiously testing things out to see if their idea is a viable business venture and if there is a market for their product or service.

2. Set a timeline.
Is there a season where it would make sense to test out your business venture? Or perhaps there’s a transitional time in your life where you’ll be looking to open a new chapter. For example, transitioning your hobby into a viable business venture a great option for active duty military personnel and veterans because they naturally begin to think about what their second career will be after retiring or leaving the Armed Forces.

3. Decide on time commitment.
Decide how much time you are willing to dedicate to your new venture in the beginning. Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss which affords you unprecedented flexibility, but the effort you put in directly effects what you get out. Keep in mind, entrepreneurship isn’t just for full-time professionals. Turning a hobby into a career is a great option for military and stay-at-home parents who require flexibility in regards to working hours and location, but they may have more open time to dedicate to the transition.

4. Create a business plan.
Transitioning a hobby into a profession is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business if you want to be successful. That means creating a business plan that includes goals and plans for attaining them. This will serve as the foundation for how you strategize and build a successful business today. Plus, when it comes time to finance your budding business, a solid business plan will give you a leg up and direction for the future.

5. Find financial backing.
Depending on what type of business you want to pursue, you may need some additional funding beyond what you can afford. Establishing a relationship with a financial institution like Navy Federal Credit Union will help you learn more about small business loans and lending products that will help your small business grow. Bring your passion and your business plan – potential investors and financial institutions alike will want to see both before they make a decision.

Never Vulnerable Again!

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Hey there, folks. It has been a long while since I posted. I have been caught up with working, being a family man, training in martial arts, and trying to get more fun and rest in. In the past two years or so is the first time in several years that I didn’t have some sort of a side business to supplement my 9 to 5 income.

My 9 to 5 situation has become a little shaky recently after I suffered an injury that has really side-lined me. I needed surgery and all. Now, money is a little tight in my household. We’re getting by, but our quality of life has diminished.

multiple streams

Why am I even telling you all of this?

Not for sympathy and not because I’m going to set-up a GoFundMe page to ask for donations or anything like that, but rather to give you a warning by example to not put all of your eggs in one basket.

That is to say don’t rely solely on your income from your job. Things can change quickly and an employee can be fired for no reason or any reason at all (except if discrimination can be proven) in 49 out of 50 states — Montana being the exception.

I strongly encourage you find something that you can do on the side to create some “cushion cash” in case something changes at your job. Learn from my mistake of becoming too comfortable. As a martial artist and past recreational boxer, I should know that I did in fact violate rule number one: Protect yourself at all times.

I am going to get back into teaching martial arts classes again after I fully recover from my injury. But what I’m really looking to do, is to create passive, recurring income. A friend of mine from Texas, named Esther, told me about a cool side business that I can operate from home. I also have realized that there are numerous tax benefits in that I can write-off a lot of the money I was already spending as classify those expenditures as business expenses. That way, I will get a larger tax return next year. It is sort of like double-dipping in that I am increasing my income and keeping more money in my pocket because I have a smaller tax bill. That is cool.

I’m building a strong fortress that the Big Bad Wolf of injury and lost pay cannot blow down.

I plan to never be vulnerable again!

Please, take care of yourself and learn from my mistake.

Thank about your current hobbies and see if you can monetize it. It will create another source of income and help you stay afloat if something happens to your job.

Thanks for your time.

My Thoughts on the Ferguson Verdict and Rioting

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I have been watching the news over the last two days and I’m disappointed at what I’m seeing. Personally, the grand jury’s verdict didn’t surprise me. I am not a lawyer, but I was aware of what the Missouri law said about police use of force.

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Here is a great explanation of why P.O. Darren Wilson was not charged –> CLICK HERE.

Folks are looting and burning businesses down in their own neighborhood. One shouldn’t do these things at all, but doing it in your own neighborhood is economic suicide.

When you burn things down and loot in a given neighborhood, property values go down. Businesses that were looted and burned-out may never return. Now you will have no businesses in your neighborhood and therefore no job opportunities. Because there are no businesses, you have to travel outside of your neighborhood to buy things which of course will not be very convenient.

Being that property values are down and you have to travel far to get to work and to buy consumer goods, you will sell your home on the cheap and eventually relocate. Your bargain basement priced home will be bought by outside investors who will hold onto the property for a few years and rebuild later. That is how gentrification starts.

Also, the National Guard has set up a perimeter around Ferguson. While I’m not a military strategy and tactics expert, here is what I do know as a retired military policeman trained in civil disturbance and crowd control:

  • During civil unrest, set up a perimeter to lay siege to a town. Nothing gets in or out without consent of command. That includes food and medical supplies.
  • A perimeter surrounds your target and makes sure that unrest doesn’t spill into adjacent areas. Also, when troops are ready to close in, the vise is ready to close.

In my humble opinion, a better thing to do is to start first local then national discussion on the police use of deadly force and use the U.S. Constitution as point of reference. National standards for police use of deadly force MAY infringe on states rights (10th Amendment), and the retention of the status quo for the police use of deadly force in various municipalities MAY violate one’s due process rights (14th Amendment).

Let’s reason together and create a system of justice for all Americans.

An Inconvenient Truth About Working While Black

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First off, this is not crying, pulling the race card or anything like that. This is just being 100% honest based on my personal e,periences. Funny thing is that oftentimes your antagonists in the workplace tend to look like you — from the same race or culture. Strange but true.

In my latest book, The 52 Corporate Caveats: How to Cover Your Ass in Corporate America, I offer up the following advice to Black men in leadership positions:

You’re a Black man in a leadership position in Corporate America. The media portrays you as a wild beast. Employees won’t give you the same respect that they GIVE to White men in your same position. You’ll have to EARN it. Mind your P’s and Q’s. Be fair, be honest and persevere.

As a Black (African-American) man who has worked in Corporate America for 25+ years and who is also a father, I must say that fictional character, Eli Pope, from the hit ABC television show, Scandal, really “keeps it real” with his daughter, Olivia. In my opinion, truer words have not been spoken. Pay attention specifically (for the purposes of this blog post) to what fictional character Eli Pope says to his daughter starting at 1:16 through 1:36. He really vocalizes how when your are Black, you have to work so much harder and still get less for their efforts. Yep, the game is kind of rigged.

Well, that is my two cents. As a Black man I would be irresponsible if I didn’t tell people what really goes on and to address the proverbial elephant in the room.

The bigotry and racism need to stop and be replaced by a system of justice that is truly fair to all. Regardless of race, creed, color, se,ual orientation, religion, gender, nationality, etc.

You know what, I will start a series of on social media called Inconvenient Truths using the hash tag #inconvenienttruths.

I leave you with the words of the great American (who happens to have been Black), Frederick Douglas:

“Men talk of the ‘negro problem’. There is no negro problem. The problem is whether they American people have honesty enough, loyalty enough, honor enough, patriotism enough to live up to their own constitution. We intend that the American people shall learn the great lesson of the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God from our presence among them.”

Thanks for your time.