The Whole 9 Yards

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Posts Tagged ‘whole 9 yards book

Do you need to work a full-time job?

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Truth is only you can answer that question.

time-question-blogging-techregion-com

However, I’d like to share information with you about the potential benefits one can enjoy while working part-time instead of full-time.

Since I left my last job working with a NYC agency, I have been working part-time and I must say that I like it. Of course, my income is not what it used to be, but this is a temporary situation. While I have been working part-time I have enrolled in an information technology school where I am training to become an IT Engineer. As an IT Engineer I will be able to assist and answer just about any question as it pertains to computer repair, installation and upgrade all Windows, MAC, and Linux systems. There is no way that I would have been able to take this course if I was working full-time.

Some say that they have full-time bills so a part-time income will not cut it. I understand that, but I have two part-time jobs so money is coming in and I have other “hustles.” Additionally, consider this: Abraham Lincoln said, “It I had four hours to chop down a tree three of those hours would be spent sharpening my ax.” That is why I’m in school – sharpening my ax so that I can chop down bigger money trees in the future.

Upon completion of my training, I will look to take a part-time internship so that I can gain experience and then eventually ease into a career as a contracted IT consultant.

Oh…

Let me tell you about my two current part-time jobs.

I work part-time for two non-profit organizations. One is where I work as a program facilitator with urban youth teaching them various socially desirable behaviors and skills and teaching academic courses in an innovative way using elements of Hip Hop music. The other part-time job is working with the YMCA as a martial arts instructor teaching children and teens Karate and teaching adults practical personal protection.

I’m also started a home-based direct sales business, but I admittedly haven’t done too much with it as of yet. It is documented that the products and the compensation plan work, but you as an independent sales agent must work to generate revenue – of course. I say that with a touch of sarcasm because it amazes me how people complain that they don’t make money in these kind of businesses, but they don’t get off of their butts to do the required work. Perhaps they don’t understand that the only thing that falls from the sky are rain drops and snow flakes – not money.

Anyway, I’d like to share a few resources to help you figure out if working part-time is feasible for you over working full-time.

Here are links to three articles that I think you may find interesting:

Thank you for your time and attention, and may whichever path you choose for yourself, I hope that it yields a bountiful harvest.

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Working in a Hostile Environment

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Now, on this blog I generally don’t discuss religion, but I take truth and inspiration where I can find it.

T.D. Jakes did a sermon/lecture called “The Ten Commandments of Working in a Hostile Environment.”

Here are the 10 commandments:

  1. GOD anoints you in trouble
  2. Don’t expect to be appreciated
  3. Seek opportunities to change the atmosphere without commenting on the problems
  4. Do your job well, but remember your mission
  5. Don’t let your environment get inside of you
  6. Increase your capacity to work with different personalities
  7. Remember that where you are does not define where you are going
  8. The goal is optimum results with minimum confusion
  9. Do not pledge allegence with the many clicks and groups that are normal at the workplace
  10. Always keep your song near you

I found this video series to be full of gems that most people can use to better navigate the sometimes troubles waters of the workplace. Better than me giving you information second-hand, I invite you to look at the video series yourself.

Below is the first video in the seven video series:

Let me know what you think.

Kill the 9-to-5 by turning your hobby into a thriving business

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(BPT) – A beloved hobby can feel like a mini vacation from everyday life. Whether it’s gardening for relaxation, photography as a creative outlet or computer coding to exercise the brain, hobbies serve as an escape from stress and boredom.

What if rather than a hobby being your escape, it was what you did for a career?

“When you do what you love, it doesn’t feel like work. However, people are intimidated by the idea of transitioning a hobby into this type of dream,” says Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal Credit Union. “Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t have to be difficult with the right drive and passion.”

hobby to biz

Navy Federal Business Services has helped thousands of people turn their dreams of owning a small business into reality by providing expert guidance and financial support through Business Services products. Here are some of Salmon’s expert tips based on best practices he’s observed through his close relationship with entrepreneurial clients:

1. Take your time.
Becoming a successful entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to drop everything and devote all your time to starting a business. In fact, research shows the opposite: People who keep their day jobs while starting companies are a third less likely to fail than those who abandon their full time jobs. Instead, they’re tinkering, researching and cautiously testing things out to see if their idea is a viable business venture and if there is a market for their product or service.

2. Set a timeline.
Is there a season where it would make sense to test out your business venture? Or perhaps there’s a transitional time in your life where you’ll be looking to open a new chapter. For example, transitioning your hobby into a viable business venture a great option for active duty military personnel and veterans because they naturally begin to think about what their second career will be after retiring or leaving the Armed Forces.

3. Decide on time commitment.
Decide how much time you are willing to dedicate to your new venture in the beginning. Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss which affords you unprecedented flexibility, but the effort you put in directly effects what you get out. Keep in mind, entrepreneurship isn’t just for full-time professionals. Turning a hobby into a career is a great option for military and stay-at-home parents who require flexibility in regards to working hours and location, but they may have more open time to dedicate to the transition.

4. Create a business plan.
Transitioning a hobby into a profession is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business if you want to be successful. That means creating a business plan that includes goals and plans for attaining them. This will serve as the foundation for how you strategize and build a successful business today. Plus, when it comes time to finance your budding business, a solid business plan will give you a leg up and direction for the future.

5. Find financial backing.
Depending on what type of business you want to pursue, you may need some additional funding beyond what you can afford. Establishing a relationship with a financial institution like Navy Federal Credit Union will help you learn more about small business loans and lending products that will help your small business grow. Bring your passion and your business plan – potential investors and financial institutions alike will want to see both before they make a decision.

Start up your future: Teaching for today’s entrepreneurial business culture

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(BPT) – Every year Christine Rainwater asks her Washington, D.C.-based undergraduate business students the same question on their first day of class: are any of you interested in starting a business?

“Ten years ago, I would only get two or three students to raise their hands,” said Rainwater, a DeVry University professor and president of the Small Business Advisory Firm. “Now, the majority of my students do – and some share ideas even before class begins. It really represents a new mindset as students take a more entrepreneurial approach to learning. I think they’re surrounded by fast-growing startups like Uber and GrubHub, and they feel inspired to quickly bring their own business ideas to life.”

open for biz

Business enterprise shows like Shark Tank, Beyond the Tank, and How I Made My Millions are indicative of a bigger business trend: renewed growth in small business and startup ventures. According to the 2015 Kauffman Index of Startup Activity and National Trends, the Startup Activity Index rose in 2015 – reversing a downward trend that began in 2010 – allowing the largest year-over-year increase in the past twenty years.

“Students see new, successful companies run by young creatives whose passion propelled them to success faster than climbing the traditional corporate ladder,” said Rainwater. “Not only is this inspiring more people to do the same, but it’s encouraging a whole new type of student to head back to school looking for resume-building experience that can jump-start job prospects right out of the program.”

Shaping a New Culture of Entrepreneurs
Today’s college student is different than past generations. In fact, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, nearly 75 percent of undergraduate students today could be considered “non-traditional.” They are often busy, working adults that have to balance the demands of school, work and family life.

Several non-traditional students need colleges that can fit into their busy schedules of work and family responsibilities. Moreover, many are coming back to school because they want to advance their current career or move to a new field quickly. Non-traditional students want their degree to speak for itself, demonstrating their capabilities and value.

That’s why Rainwater puts hands-on learning at the center of her curriculum.

“In my Senior Projects course, I challenge my students to explore their own neighborhoods, develop business plans for local companies and even kick-start businesses of their own,” she said. “It’s always rewarding to see their eyes light up when they first come up with a viable idea, or see the impact they’ve made in their communities.”

The approach has given students real-life experience and has encouraged collaboration with local organizations. Online grocery store Relay Foods enlisted the help of Rainwater’s students to revamp their salsa canning and distribution plan. As a result, the students were able to help the grocer increase brand awareness and customer appeal for their signature salsa. Another student turned her passion for making premium homemade soap into a business, eventually turning the side job into an online boutique.

The Benefits of Breakthrough for Rising Innovators
Outside the classroom, Rainwater is the president of the Small Business Advisory Firm, a network focused on meeting the educational, networking and program-specific requirements to compete in the federal and private-sector contracting environment.

“In the past, people had to go through an extensive process to start their own businesses,” said Rainwater. “Today, technology has removed many of the barriers that used to stand between big thinkers and entrepreneurship.”

Rainwater considers immersive learning an imperative tool for business students’ professional development. She believes that it not only fosters creative thinking and entrepreneurial spirit, but also creates a safe environment for students to build tangible skills that can be immediately implemented in the workplace – across a variety of roles and practices.

To help today’s students learn more about starting a new business, DeVry University offers a small business management and entrepreneurship degree specialization within its College of Business & Management. At the graduate level, its Keller Graduate School of Management offers an entrepreneurship concentration within its MBA program.

“Right now, U.S. startup activity is rising for the first time in five years, showing entrepreneurs are the most hopeful they have been in several years,” said Rainwater. “And the beauty of these entrepreneurship programs is they not only teach students how to grow businesses, but they arm them with skills to succeed when they hit obstacles along the way – setting them up for long-term success.”

Written by Tyrone Turner

April 20, 2016 at 9:45 pm

An Inconvenient Truth About Working While Black

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First off, this is not crying, pulling the race card or anything like that. This is just being 100% honest based on my personal e,periences. Funny thing is that oftentimes your antagonists in the workplace tend to look like you — from the same race or culture. Strange but true.

In my latest book, The 52 Corporate Caveats: How to Cover Your Ass in Corporate America, I offer up the following advice to Black men in leadership positions:

You’re a Black man in a leadership position in Corporate America. The media portrays you as a wild beast. Employees won’t give you the same respect that they GIVE to White men in your same position. You’ll have to EARN it. Mind your P’s and Q’s. Be fair, be honest and persevere.

As a Black (African-American) man who has worked in Corporate America for 25+ years and who is also a father, I must say that fictional character, Eli Pope, from the hit ABC television show, Scandal, really “keeps it real” with his daughter, Olivia. In my opinion, truer words have not been spoken. Pay attention specifically (for the purposes of this blog post) to what fictional character Eli Pope says to his daughter starting at 1:16 through 1:36. He really vocalizes how when your are Black, you have to work so much harder and still get less for their efforts. Yep, the game is kind of rigged.

Well, that is my two cents. As a Black man I would be irresponsible if I didn’t tell people what really goes on and to address the proverbial elephant in the room.

The bigotry and racism need to stop and be replaced by a system of justice that is truly fair to all. Regardless of race, creed, color, se,ual orientation, religion, gender, nationality, etc.

You know what, I will start a series of on social media called Inconvenient Truths using the hash tag #inconvenienttruths.

I leave you with the words of the great American (who happens to have been Black), Frederick Douglas:

“Men talk of the ‘negro problem’. There is no negro problem. The problem is whether they American people have honesty enough, loyalty enough, honor enough, patriotism enough to live up to their own constitution. We intend that the American people shall learn the great lesson of the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God from our presence among them.”

Thanks for your time.

Friends, Here’s to You

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I heard a Maya Angelou quote a couple of years ago that is so very true:

“People may forget what you said or did, but they never forget how you made them feel.”

As I travel through life and have been fortunate enough to achieve some success in few of my endeavors, I am surprised by how some that I thank respond.

They were just doing what they do as they are good people, but they had NO IDEA how much their kind words, actions, or just the road map that they provided me with from just observing them, had a positive effect on me.

Remember, people are watching and listening, and though they may forget details of what was said or done, they remember how you made them feel great. I remember those who have helped me – especially over the last 18 months, and I am thankful.

In the words of my friends from the legendary R&B group, Skyy, “Here’s to You,” my true friends.

Peace and good fortune to you all.

YOU can resurrect!

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Though I am not religious, this is apropos for Easter weekend: Some may try to assassinate your reputation and burn down all that you worked for, but you are a phoenix and WILL rise from the ashes and achieve levels of success never before imagined.

fiery phoenix

Stay focused. Stay strong. Stay calm. Stay humble.

Be thankful knowing that adversity is like childbirth in that it may be painful but brings forth a new life and opportunities at creating an enviable legacy.

Peace and good fortune to all.